No menu items!

What is the Class Width for a Histogram? (with Examples)

-

The class width of a histogram refers to the thickness of each of the bars in the given histogram. The histogram can have either equal or unequal class widths. If the histogram has equal class widths then each of the bars has the same thickness. if the bars have different thicknesses it means that the histogram has unequal class intervals.

Let us understand both situations by looking at some examples.

Example 1: Equal Class Widths

Consider the following set of data given in the tabular form.

Class IntervalsFrequency
40-456
45-5012
50-5515
55-604
60-659
65-7011

In the above table, we see that each of the class intervals has an equal length of 10. Thus the bars in the histogram have equal width as shown below:

Histogram with Equal Class Widths
Histogram with Equal Class Widths

Example 2: Unequal Class Widths

Consider the following set of data given in the tabular form.

Class IntervalsFrequency
0-1315
13-1822
18-2625
26-3219
32-4020

In the above table, we see that each of the first class intervals has a length of 13, the second class interval has a width of 5, the third class interval has a width of 8, and so on. As expected the bars in the histogram have unequal width as shown below:

Histogram with Unequal Class Widths
Histogram with Unequal Class Widths

Hey 👋

I'm currently pursuing a Ph.D. in Maths. Prior to this, I completed my master's in Maths & bachelors in Statistics.

I created this website for explaining maths and statistics concepts in the simplest possible manner.

If you've found value from reading my content, feel free to support me in even the smallest way you can.



Share this article

Recent posts

Popular categories

Recent comments